INNER MONOLOGUE PROJECT

INNER MONOLOGUE AND SNEAKER ART PROJECT

Led by Actor, Teaching Artist, and Trauma Survivor, Keith Mascol

The nomination period for this program is now closed

Photo of the Boys 2 Men Monologue Project participants in Cambridge, Massachusetts, August 2020.

The Inner Monolgue and Sneaker Art Project uses art to guide young men in writing a personal monologue including their thoughts about manhood, mental health, being Black and Brown during the Black Lives Matter movement, and being resilient. Written and performance aspects are complemented by a visual arts component as each participant selects a resonating line or sentiment from their monologue and writes it on a pair of sneakers and a personal protective mask.  Sneakers and masks carry a significance different from items like t-shirts, and writing on them deepens the transformational power of the workshop.  This program guides young men from metaphorically wearing their emotions “on their sleeve” to concretely and visibly wearing their own words on their shoes and masks. This action provides them with a way to externalize emotions versus internalizing emotions that are a result of the social context.

The monologue curriculum is developed and led by performance artist, teacher, and Trauma Survivor Keith Mascoll. Mascoll’s one-man play, Triggered Life is based in part upon his own adolescent experiences with trauma, has helped audiences across the nation understand the often masked legacy of sexual abuse and trauma among men, and the impact it has on their entire community.

This four-session program takes place online from 10-11 am on Saturdays: February 20 and 27 and March 6. The final session will take place in person (following strict COVID protocols) from 10am - 12pm on March 13th.

The nomination period for this program is now closed.

The Triggered Project believes self-care for the Black community is a political act, which is the first step for social change. Learn more about it here:

Thank you to our sponsors

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This project is supported by funds from the Oregon Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts.

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